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Advantage of Fertilizer Urea

Author:

Hou

Oct. 21, 2022
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Urea is widely used in the agricultural sector both as a fertilizer and animal feed additive. The main function of Urea fertilizer is to provide the plants with nitrogen to promote green leafy growth and make the plants look lush. Urea also aids the photosynthesis process of plants.

Nitrogen helps jumpstart many plants during their growing cycle, helping them develop stronger cells for photosynthesis. It also helps manufacture and store proteins essential to plant survival. In many plants, it helps develop a deep green color, a sign photosynthesis is working well. When leaves begin to yellow, it could be from a nitrogen deficiency.

Plants cant eat urea in the form you spread across your yard. Instead, plants use the byproducts produced as urea starts to break down. Urea initially breaks down as ammonium, then turns into nitrate. This breakdown begins immediately after spreading the Urea, which is why you must work fast to incorporate it into the soil, preferably within two days. The ammonium might be released as a gas if the granules sit on top of the surface, reducing the amount of material that turns into helpful nitrate in the soil.

The nitrogen from the Urea 46 stays in the soil until the plants either use it up or its leached out by water. The amount of time its available varies, depending on how many plants the urea is feeding and how much rainfall the area gets. Even if some remain in the soil when youre ready to add more fertilizer, it might not be enough to support the plants through the next season. Testing nitrogen levels with self-test kits let you know when its time to add more Urea.

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Advantage of Fertilizer Urea

can be applied to soil as a solid or solution or to certain crops as a foliar spray.

Urea usage involves little or no fire or explosion hazard.

Ureas high analysis, 46% N, helps reduce handling, storage and transportation costs over other dry N forms.

Urea manufacture releases few pollutants to the environment.

Urea, when properly applied, results in crop yield increases equal to other forms of nitrogen.

Incorporate urea for best use

Nitrogen from urea can be lost to the atmosphere if fertilizer urea remains on the soil surface for extended periods of time during warm weather. The key to the most efficient use of urea is to incorporate it into the soil during a tillage operation. It may also be blended into the soil with irrigation water. A rainfall of as little as 0.25 inches is sufficient to blend urea into the soil to a depth at which ammonia losses will not occur.

If properly applied, urea and fertilizers containing urea are excellent sources of nitrogen for crop production. After application to the soil, urea undergoes chemical changes and ammonium (NH4 +) ions form. Soil moisture determines how rapidly this conversion takes place.

When a urea particle dissolves, the area around it becomes a zone of high pH and ammonia concentration. This zone can be quite toxic for a few hours. Seed and seedling roots within this zone can be killed by the free ammonia that has formed. Fortunately, this toxic zone becomes neutralized in most soils as the ammonia converts to ammonium. Usually its just a few days before plants can effectively use the nitrogen. Although urea imparts an alkaline reaction when first applied to the soil, the net effect is to produce an acid reaction.

Urea or materials containing urea should, in general, be broadcast and immediately incorporated into the soil. Urea-based fertilizer applied in a band should be separated from the seed by at least two inches of soil. Under no circumstances should urea or urea-based fertilizer be seed-placed with corn.

With small grains, 10 lb. of nitrogen as urea can generally be applied with the grain drill at seeding time even under dry conditions.

 


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